Here's a quick pic of my hard at work in the forge. I am in the process of making some components for a replica 18th century range and a chimney crane for an 1840's Coalbrookdale open range.

Very ealry ‘Open’ Range

Now here is something that doesn't come up very often at all. It's a beautifully cast early 'open' range, called such because the firebox was open rather than the fully enclosed ranges produced later in the century. This range bridges the gap between the 18th century open down hearth ranges and the later closed type. Early cooking was preformed in a wrought iron grate, usually with adjustable cheeks with various ancillary parts like a chimney crane, spits and smoke jacks and spit jacks etc to turn them.
Here, various features of the earlier method have been retained like the adjustable cheek (used to alter the size of the fire) and chimney crane. However, the fire now features an oven and hot plates for cooking and the whole is cast into a range with fantastic classical detailing. The cheek is moved via a rack that is wound with a crank handle engaged in a socket to the bottom left of the firebox- a great detail!
I have loosely mocked this range up but will be restoring it at some point early next year unless otherwise requested. Most likely dating from around 1830-1840.

We've had another busy week with 1 Georgian register grate, 1 Belle Portable, 1 Cottage range and 16 forged shutter closers being completed ready for delivery today. The grate and range are being supplied with a pair of matching bespoke Bath stone surrounds and they'll look great in their new home! The Belle Portable has been fully insulated internally to make it's installation into a Ploughman's living wagon that much safer. The shutter closers work on the principle of snail cam, or more accurately a scroll cam. The scroll catches onto a pintle driven into the window frame and as it is turned draws the shutter tighter in.

Iron and Copper candle sconce

Here is an Iron and Copper candle sconce I recently made for a customer. It's based on a design used on a 18th century German candle stick I saw at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. The scroll forms a leaf spring that holds the candle within the ring facillitating the use of any size candle. The back plate is of polished copper. All rivets are of brass. Apologies for the poor photo!